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Impressed by this apparently rigorous approach, Ms Fontaine, 44, rang up to enquire about joining and a consultant invited her to an interview, not at the company’s registered offices in the City of London but at the Charing Cross Hotel on The Strand.‘I thought it was a bit strange but was quite happy because it was on my way home,’ says Ms Fontaine. She was given his email address and sent him a message. They emailed her some more details, for a man with a Persian-sounding name, who was 56 and worked in financial investments.

Dating an emotionally abused woman

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Emotionally abused women, though their abuse isn't visible through physical scars, can experience post-breakup symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

If you are in a relationship with someone who has been emotionally and verbally abused, her past experience may be casting a dark shadow over the present.

Here are seven ways those of us who have been emotionally abused love differently: Even if we think we're really into you, we're going to keep our distance.

We'll keep you at arm's length, might not text you back immediately, and definitely won't want to spend too much time with you. After you've been emotionally abused, being able to open up freely is painful.

For us, it's safer if we just keep some things to ourselves.

Ten years after experiencing the hardest breakup up of her life, *Ani, a writer, speaker and domestic violence advocate, sat facing the man who used to build her up and destroy her all at the same time.

We'll keep you at arm's length, might not text you back immediately, and definitely won't want to spend too much time with you. You're exposing the bits and pieces of you that all of a sudden make you a target. I don't mean just physically slow, but emotionally and mentally slow.

Many victims of verbal and emotional abuse have spent so much time trying to fit a mold made by their abuser that they lose their sense of self, according to the Psychology Today article, "Emotional Abuse: Recovering the Core Self." You can help your partner by giving him some space and taking things slow.

We don't want to put ourselves in a vulnerable situation again and when you open up about yourself, that's exactly what you're doing.

You're exposing the bits and pieces of you that all of a sudden make you a target.

They can also use controlling tactics such as limiting contact with others, reading texts and emails, stalking and withholding emotion. Nearly half of all women and men in the United States have experienced this kind of abuse from an intimate partner sometime in their life, according to the 2010 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report, "National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey." Even if your partner is still dealing with the effects of abuse, there are ways to provide support as she heals and moves forward.

Even though verbal and emotional abuse doesn't leave physical damage, victims may have deep internal wounds that need time to heal.

Emotional and verbal abuse is a way to exert control and power over someone else.

Abusers may yell, taunt, call names and threaten their victim.

You don't bear the bruises of a physical attack, but you're still scarred in many ways, and that scarring leaves an imprint that can affect every future relationship.

It's hard to love again after you've been manipulated, put down, controlled, belittled, and made to feel worthless by someone who was supposed to love you and care about you.

She says that over time — and months of self-help after struggles she had faced to let him go — he had lost the magical edge.

But apparently not his gravitational pull or her need to know why. I was just very curious," Ani says of the encounter.